How to live sarah bakewell book review

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How to Live is a superb, spirited introduction to the master, and should have its readers rushing straight to the essays themselves. Brilliant, original, funny and moving — a vivid portrait of Montaigne, showing how his ideas gave birth to our modern sense of our inner selves, from Shakespeare's plays to the dilemmas we face today.

Montaigne himself was interesting enough.

how to live sarah bakewell book review

She notes at the end of this book that it was five years in the making, and I don't doubt that at all. Delete Comment Are you sure you want to delete this comment?

How to Live by Sarah Bakewell – review

This is what Virginia Woolf's chain of minds really means: In terms of literature, you'll read about the battles among Montaigne's French and British translators. But first we have to go all the way back to the Reformation. But, I know, now, better than ever before in life, that 'timing is everything. US Politics.

how to live sarah bakewell book review

Would that I had read Montaigne in college. Please try again, the name must be unique.

how to live sarah bakewell book review

Jun 22, 2012 Ryan Holiday rated it it was amazing. But there's no reason to doubt that he was a genuinely devoted Catholic, as he understood that.

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Find your bookmarks in your Independent Minds section, under my profile. His morbid state of mind, however, ended with a dramatic encounter with his own death, or near death. She's careful to tell us what makes this particular strain of Skepticism unique. Final Say. Bakewell manages to move roughly chronologically through Montaigne's life, setting his writing within his biography, his personal relationships, his work as a public servant, and his historical context.

how to live sarah bakewell book review